Date Archives: February 2015

Coldwell Banker American Homes Blog Home

Subscribe and receive email notifications of new blog posts.




rss logo RSS Feed
Area Information | 27 Posts
BPT | 10 Posts
Buying | 6 Posts
Homeowners | 17 Posts
Real Estate Blogs | 319 Posts
RREIN | 62 Posts
Uncategorized | 148 Posts
Buying a Home | Home Purchase Guidelines | Long Island Homes and Property | Real Estate for Long Island | Energy Efficient Homes | Homeowner Tax Credits | Tax Credits for Home Energy Efficiency | Adjustable Rate Mortgages | Mortgages for the Long Island real estate market | The Right Mortgage for the Right Home Buyer | Real Estate Question of the Day! | Real Estate - scams and mortgages | What you need to know about real estate | Home Purchase Savings | Interest rates offer greatest leverage | Tax credit vs mortgage interest rates | Assisted Living | VA Special Pension | home loans | Home mortgage rates | Another Interest Rate Drop | Mortgage Interest Rates | Defending homeownership | Is now the time to buy a home? | Real Estate - still a great investment | Long Island condo & co-op | Long Island Homes for sale | Long Island Properties | Negotiating house purchase price | New construction on Long Island | Real Estate transfer fees | buy your home through a short sale purchase | selling short with the banks approval | Short sale home purchase | $2000 home buyer grant | New York State home buying grants | home list price vs. home sales price | negotiate a new home sales price | New York State STAR tax exemption | STAR tax exemption for New York homeowners | Buyer Brokerage | Real Estate Representation | Seller Agency | Tips for improving your credit score | Home and property appraisals | Homeowner Tax Advantages | Home Purchase Track | Owning a home vs. Renting | 55+ Adult Community | Senior housing | The Season's at East Meadow | co-op | Condo's | Homes | land for sale | Why Now is a Great Time to Buy a Home on Long Island | Homeownership | Open House weekend | home buying process | mortgage prequalification | Real Estate Investment Tips | Tips to Flip your real estate | Home Shopping Checklist | Look for a house with a checklist | ips to purchasing a short sale home | Short sales: How to purchase | Cut energy costs for your home | home energy efficiency | Loan application mistakes | mortgage loans | mortgage home loans | What home loan is right for you? | house hunting | Hunting for a home | Common Home Defects | What to look for when buying a home | first time home buyers | The 1st time home buyers guide | mobile based home search | Mobile phone users - coupons | smart phone applications | Housing Market Recovery Bright Spots | Natianal Housing Market Report | Home Closing - contract to closing | Home purchase timeline | 203k home mortgage program | Home Improvement Funding | Myths of the real estate market | The Home Buying Process | narrow down your home search | The Best location for your home purchase | buying a home? protect your credit! | credit protection | Home value pitfalls | home closing steps to take | New home closing | Home Styles | Popular Homes | best interest rates | credit scores | Create Energy within Your Home with Feng Shui | Feng Shui within your home | consumer confidence | home buyers more confident in housing market | Real Estate market impact | Rent verse Buy | Renters Outspend Owners on Housing | Benefits of home buying | Winter shopping for homes | Consumers confidence in home ownership | Homeownership attitudes | Real estate tax advantages & tips | Tax tips for homeowners | job opportunity | real estate agent | real estate career | rental agent | 1st time home buyer tips | priorities for home buyers | make moving fun for family | Moving for the family | Buy a foreclosure | REO purchase tips | Tips to buying a foreclosure property | Use a real estate agent to buy a home | Use a real estate agent to sell a home | Why use a real estate agent | Home Buying steps | Home Buying tips | Stepr to take prior to buying a home | home loan good faith estimate | Tips to your home loan mortgage | FICO Scores | How FICO scores are calculated | Your FICO score | Invest in a home | tax refund - invest it in your home purchase | VA Loan | The Home Buyers Wish List | Home buying expectations | real estate market report | Bidding on real estate properties | purchase offers for your home | home mortgage | downsizing your home | moving to a smaller house | Jumbo Loans for Home Purchase | Mortgage Money Lesson | newlywed home purchasing tips | The perfect wedding gift... a new home | Avoid these home buying mistakes | common mistakes when buying a home | Good News for Housing | Home Price Index | Bank fees for the homeowner | understanding banks and their fees | Home Inspections for your new home purchase | What to know about home inspections | Fire safety for your home | Is your home fire safe? | Home Mortgage programs | LTV | Mortgage loan to value | Mortgage relief for disaster challenged areas | Location | Property location - real estate | buying a short sale property | short sale tips | buying a home - best investment? | When is the best time to buy? | New Years resolutions | Resolutions: a Reality for Realty's | Get a mortgage after foreclosure | mortgage financing - after foreclosure | Is it a good time to buy a home? | What age is old enough to buy a home? | Buy a short sale property | Short Sale real estate properties | Home property tax deductions | real estate tax deductions | Real Estate License School | Apartment Rentals | House Rentals | Real Estate Rental Agent | House Hunting Tips | Simple house hunting tips & ideas | Mortgage advice - current trends | mortgaging & refinancing in 2013 | Good credit score = best equal rates | How to build up your credit score | lease - option to buy | Rent with option to buy | Avoid Home Improvement Blunders | Home improvements ideas for the property owner | Home Buyers - What do you really want? | Needs & wants of home buyers | mortgage loans for new home construction | New construction home loans | Home Buyers - Price & proximity to work | Key Concerns for the home buyer | Impressive mortgage applications | Keys to getting your mortgage approved | Home buying mistakes to avoid | Home purchasing blunders to avoid | New homes vs older homes | to buy or not to buy a home | pet friendly rentals | Pets or no pets - apartment rentals | tips for home purchasers | Flipping houses | home flpipping 101 | spec houses | home buyer how to's | how to be a better home buyer | Mortgage amortization | A happy home | What makes you really happy? | Low housing inventory | Low inventory housing market | Home prices on the rise | Rising property values | Home buyer tips to open houses | Open House etiquette | Winning a home purchase bidding war | Home mortgage rate tips | mortgage tips for the new home owner | Home Equity Line versus 2nd Mortgage | buy a new home or expand your current home | Home improvements vs. new home purchse | Mortgage Rate Lock | Residential home mortgage rates | Improve your economic profile for home mortgage | Personal Finance | Costly problems for new home buyers | New home buyers avoid costly problems | Handy man special | The home fixer-upper | How to refinance | Refinance - without perfect credit | Debt to Income | Tackling Debt | Seasonal real estate trends | The fall season housing market | Factor in home repairs in your mortgage payment | Home repairs for new home purchasers | Home sellers negotiation techniques | negotiations for home buyers & sellers | The home buying process - stress free | The process of buying a home | Recently Read | Saved for Later | Great Neck | Massapequa | Huntington | Ronkonkoma | Brooklyn | East Meadow | Coldwell Banker American Homes | Local Attractions | Home Improvement | Interior Design | Queens | Fresh Meadows | Long Beach | Local Businesses | Farmingdale | Home selling | Suffolk County | Nassau County | Wantagh
February
25

Moving to a new home can be life-changing. The reasons for a move vary: you may have a growing family, you might be empty-nesting, or you may just need of a change of pace. But how do you know you're really ready to move? Watch for these classic signs:   move   You've thought through the details. You've worked out the logistics – where you want to live, when you want to move, what kind of home you want – and feel confident about your decision. Your family situation is changing. Shifting family dynamics may mean it's time to either move-up or downsize. If your household spatial needs are changing, re-evaluate your current residence to determine whether it's time for a new chapter. You did your homework. Investing in a new home is not to be taken lightly. You've taken steps to align your finances with your goals – you've saved enough for a down payment, crunched numbers, kept tabs on interest rates and corrected any errors on your credit report. You're ready to make a dream come true. Perhaps you've always wanted to own a home in the suburbs. Or a waterfront property. Or a horse ranch. If you're ready to transition to your ideal home, it may be time for a move. Source: RISMedia's Housecall Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
21

Five to 10 minutes may not seem like much, but it can add up quickly when cooking a weeknight meal. According to a recent survey by Consumer Reports, the average difference between actual time spent in the kitchen and what respondents desired is eight minutes.   kitchen   With that goal in mind, create the ultimate time-saving kitchen with these expert tips from chefs, designers, organizers and more.  
1. Design for efficiency. The work triangle – connecting the sink, fridge, and cooktop – is still the baseline for maximum efficiency. But in two-cook kitchens, it often makes sense to have a second triangle, possibly designated around an island counter with a prep sink.   2. Think ahead. One of the top cooking gripes in Consumer Reports' survey was that it takes too much time to plan. A slow cooker is handy for make-ahead meals. Most have nonstick interiors that help with cleanup, saving you even more time after the meal.   3. Minimize maintenance. Some materials and finishes are harder to care for than others. Stainless-steel appliances remain popular, but if fingerprints are a concern, consider installing a model with a smudge-resistant finish. As for flooring, vinyl held up best in Consumer Reports tests against scratches and dents.   4. Contain the clutter. In the kitchen, try to store things close at hand. For example, dishes and flatware should be kept in a cabinet next to the dishwasher; cutting boards and sharp knives belong near the food prep counter. Creating a separate landing spot, ideally just off the kitchen or along its perimeter, for mail, school papers and the like will help keep counters clear.   5. Make it a family affair. Look for ways to enlist other members of the household. If kids are present, designate a lower cabinet for everyday dishes or flatware, allowing young ones to help set the table.  
Source: Consumer Reports Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
19

Mortgage holders: Do you know your interest rate? According to a recent Bankrate.com report, just over a third of mortgage borrowers (35 percent) aren't completely sure of the interest rate they're paying. One in seven mortgage holders reported being "not too confident," "not all confident" or simply have no idea what their interest rates are.     "Your mortgage is one of the most important numbers in your financial life, and there's a good chance that one of your neighbors has no idea regarding how much he or she is paying," says Holden Lewis, senior mortgage analyst at Bankrate.com. "Given how far mortgage rates have fallen, these people could be missing substantial opportunities to save money by refinancing."   Mortgage rates are well below historical norms. The average fixed-rate 30-year mortgage is now 3.80%. It was well above six percent as recently as 2008, and in 2000, it was close to eight percent. Refinancing a $200,000 loan from 6% to 3.80% would save $267 per month; refinancing from 8% to 3.80% would save $536 per month.   Analysts expect mortgage rates to rise in the coming months.   Source: Bankrate Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
18

(BPT) - The kitchen is the heart of the home and a top-selling feature with homebuyers. Does yours convey style and functionality? Whether you've just completed a remodel or you're looking for ways to upgrade your existing kitchen, a tile backsplash will instantly transform the space into an eye-catching masterpiece.   Luxury home kitchen with a granite island.   'Tile backsplashes are timeless, providing the ideal transition between the cabinetry and the countertop,' says Kirsty Froelich, design director for The Tile Shop. 'It's one of the number one ways homeowners can add value to their kitchen while adhering to their personal design preferences. Best yet, the process can be simple and enjoyable.'   Froelich offers her top tips for designing a stylish backsplash for your kitchen without headaches or stress:   1. Determine your style profile and take action Start by looking at Houzz, Pinterest and home magazines to see what styles you're drawn to. Are you more contemporary, vintage or transitional? It can help to see backsplashes in person to get a true idea of how different materials look, feel and reflect light. For up close and personal inspiration, attend your local Parade of Homes, or visit a showroom environment like The Tile Shop to view multiple styled vignettes.   2. Follow your vision When exploring tile or stone, think about whether you want the backsplash to be a focal point or more subdued. Subway tiles in neutral tones are timeless for those who prefer a muted backsplash. If you're looking to make a statement, clean and tumbled white marble is trending right now. Slate is comforting and earthy where metallic offers a more eye-catching and contemporary look. For added personality, consider designs with color, patchwork or patterns. 'Pop art' is also really hot right now (e.g., incorporating Andy Warhol visuals into the backsplash design).   3. Consider product type and maintenance requirements A backsplash isn't necessarily maintenance-free, so know how much time you're willing to spend before making a final design decision. If you prefer low maintenance, the best route is ceramic tile. If you are drawn to the beauty of natural stone, keep in mind that there's minimal annual maintenance, including resealing the surface to ensure the product's integrity and beauty last.   'One of my current favorite backsplash looks is a new globally influenced Decor Mayflower pattern featured in The Tile Shop's 2015 Spring Design catalog,' says Froelich. 'It coordinates with the Treviso solid ceramic tiles that are available in three beautiful colors. Each piece has a handmade look and feel inspired by classic looks from long ago. This collection will definitely add a wow factor to your backsplash.'   'Another collection I love is the Devonshire Cararra marble. It's crisp, clean and particularly elegant when set in herringbone pattern by itself or when paired with a picture frame design incorporating polished mosaic and marble profiles.'   4. Know your budget Before digging into any home improvement project, it's important to know your budget. Convey your visions and cost parameters to any experts you work with, such as a contractor or interior designer. Bring a sample of your cabinetry and countertop, or a picture of your kitchen, to the designer or showroom you're working with. It will help them maximize your budget while achieving your vision.   5. Add personal touches When finalizing your design, consider adding unique characteristics. Above the sink or cooktop are good places to do something more decorative. If appropriate, you might decide to add a niche with a cutout that has tile on the interior that matches the exterior tile or create a picture frame design using a completely different style of tile and stone that complements the backsplash to make a statement. Additionally, if you are doing a backsplash in a bar area, it's a great place to have fun with materials and shapes.   'Adding a backsplash does so much to dress up a room and complete the space,' says Froelich. 'The most common mistake I see homeowners make is letting indecisiveness cause the project to be delayed. Alas, the above tips will help create a clear path toward a backsplash design they can feel confident in and admire for years to come.'
February
16

Buying an older home can net you lots of charm and character, often at a more affordable price than you'd pay for a newer model. But, say home improvement gurus, a few strategic renovations can go a long way toward making it more comfortable and efficient.   door     Renovation expert Bob Vila, host of TV's popular "This Old House," suggests the top six projects new owners may want to plan for when they move into an older home:   New front door – Replacing a decades-old front door will do more than improve your home's curb appeal. A high quality new door will enhance energy efficiency and provide more dependable security.   New windows – Old windows are drafty and hard to operate. Replacement windows that meet Energy Star® guidelines are not only beautiful and easy to open but will save you hundreds of dollars a year on heating and cooling bills.   Updated electrical system – Modern life involves a lot of gadgets. If you are experience tripped circuits, buzzing noises, or dimming lights when you turn something on, a licensed electrician can update your system to make it safer and more compatible with today's electronics.   More open floor plan – Older homes were built with smaller, boxed-in rooms that were fairly easy to heat. If you long for a more open floor plan, a licensed contractor can remove barriers and design a brighter, airier, more inviting arrangement of space.   Floors worth a second look – Owners of older homes often find the happy surprise of hardwood flooring under worn linoleum and carpets. If that's the case, think about refinishing. In any case, check it out before installing new tile or carpeting.   Cook's kitchen – An older kitchen can be a cheerful and homey gathering place. But if you're not happy with the old cabinetry and countertops, replacements for both are a great investment – not just for you, but as a draw for new owners when and if you decide to sell the house.   Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
12

(BPT) - It's rare to get something right the very first time you try it, but when it comes to buying your first home, a lack of knowledge and experience can lead to costly mistakes. One in four first-time homebuyers say they are completely unfamiliar with the mortgage financing process, according to a report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Even among those with an understanding of the overall process, the report found that many first time homebuyers still had significant knowledge gaps in important areas such as available mortgage rates, closing costs, down-payment requirements and income required to qualify for a loan.     first     'Not having all the information available could lead to consumers paying a higher interest rate or failing to secure an affordable mortgage for the home they want,' says Eric Hamilton, president of Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance. 'While most first-time homebuyers understand the importance of their credit report score in securing a mortgage, it's important they arm themselves with comprehensive knowledge. Fortunately, there's plenty of useful information out there for borrowers who want to do their homework before diving into the loan process.'   Vanderbilt Mortgage offers eight tips for first-time homebuyers:   1. Adjust your budget A mortgage payment can increase your monthly housing expenses, so prepare by calculating what that amount will be and begin saving that same amount every month so you can get used to the budget change in advance. Use a free online payment calculator to help you predict your payment and understand your current debt-to-income ratio.   2. Plan for a down payment. Nearly all home loans will require you to put some money down as a down payment. Some home loans may require as much as 20 percent of the purchase cost as a down payment, although some Federal Housing Administration loans may require less. Decide on the amount you think you'll need and create a savings plan to help you reach that goal.   3. Consider the location and type of home you want to buy. Many factors influence the cost of a home, including its location, size, style and more. A larger home in a high-income area will generally cost more, and property taxes will be higher on a bigger, newer, well-located home. Many first-time homebuyers find manufactured or mobile homes are a good option. Knowing the estimated cost of the type of home you want to purchase can help you better manage your budget.   4. Stay on top of your credit. Lenders will consider your credit score and report history when determining your mortgage eligibility and the interest rate they may offer you. Make sure to review your credit report in advance. You can download a free credit report once a year from all three major bureaus at https://ift.tt/o2j1vQ. If you're planning to apply for a mortgage, it's a good idea to review your report more frequently and to consider paying to obtain your credit score from at least one major bureau. If your report contains errors, work with the credit bureaus to have them corrected before you apply for a mortgage.   5. Keep current on monthly bills. While it's important to save toward a down payment, don't let monthly bills slide. Paying your bills on time every month can help increase your credit score, and a good payment history is something lenders look for when reviewing your credit report. Use online tools like email reminders and automatic payment options to help ensure you never miss or make a late payment.   6. Work on your debt. If you have delinquent balances, bring them up to date as quickly as possible. If you carry a lot of revolving credit card debt, you may want to work to reduce it by paying more than the monthly minimum payment. While it helps to have a report that shows no late payments, the most important thing is to not have any delinquent balances before you get pre-qualified for a mortgage.   7. Plan for escrow. In addition to the amount you will need each month toward repaying your mortgage, you'll need escrow - an amount added to each monthly mortgage payment that is applied toward annual homeowners' insurance premiums and/or taxes. Estimating taxes and total insurance costs can help you better understand how much your escrow will be each month, and you'll be able to budget more accurately as you prepare for home ownership. Don't forget that this amount may adjust every 12 months if your insurance premium or taxes change for the next year.   8. Take advantage of educational resources. From lenders' websites to government agencies, it's easy to find plenty of information online. Check out resources like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Federal Housing Administration.
February
10

If you're a homeowner considering a move, you may be wondering what's next. Do I need to renovate the kitchen? Repaint the exterior? Replace the flooring? Before taking on a costly remodel, consider this: these measures don't always recoup the highest percentages in return. Many sellers have much more success by investing in upgrades that boost their home's value in the process. The best part? Both sides of the transaction profit.   Consumer Reports recommends completing these updates:         1. Paint key rooms. In the grand scheme of things, painting is one of the least expensive ways to freshen up your home for sale, but it can cost up to $300 a room if you're hiring a pro to do your entire home. Save big by painting just a few select areas: high-traffic rooms, like the kitchen and bathrooms, and rooms with brightly-painted walls. You can save even more by doing the project yourself – a gallon of paint averages about $30.   2. Spruce up the exterior. Your home's exterior is the first impression for many buyers online and in person. Aside from keeping up with maintenance like mowing the lawn and trimming shrubs, assess the outside of your home for any repair work – a fading front door, cracked siding or a loose step – that needs to be completed before selling. And don't forget about the roof. If it needs to be replaced, choose an inexpensive but durable option, like standard, three-tab asphalt shingles. They cost approximately $75 per 100 square feet, including installation.   3. Upgrade the bathroom. Bathrooms can become a point of contention for buyers if they're not in tip-top shape. Rather than taking on an expensive renovation, make minor upgrades that have an impact. Caulk the tub, re-grout tile, and install new fixtures. Larger, less costly fixes are also a possibility if you know where to look – a new vanity, for instance, can cost less than $1,000 if you shop around.   4. Make kitchen repairs. Buyers want to be wowed by the kitchen, but that doesn't mean you have to fork over tens of thousands of dollars to make that happen. Focus on making repairs that cost well under $500, like tightening a leaky faucet or eliminating burn marks on countertops. For a cheap alternative to repainting your cabinets, consider updating your hardware in a modern finish.   5. Clean, clean, clean. Even if the home has been renovated top to bottom, a messy appearance can be the ultimate deal breaker. Fortunately for sellers, de-cluttering and de-personalizing doesn't have to cost a dime. A short list that will help buyers visualize living in the home:  
- Vacuum, dust and wipe all surfaces regularly while your home is on the market. - Pare down closets to the bare essentials. - Replace family or otherwise personal photos with neutral wall art. - Cut clutter in cabinets and on bookshelves. - Keep counter and tabletops clear, especially during an open house.  
If the project is overwhelming, consider hiring a professional cleaning service or organizer to cut through the chaos. A pro can cost anywhere from $600 to $2,500.     Source: Consumer Reports Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
6

(BPT) - Have you ever wished you had more space in your home? Maybe you'd use the space to pursue a hobby, host out-of-town guests or just spread out and get some quiet time to yourself. The space you desire could already be in your home in your basement. If your cellar is nothing but a series of unfinished areas used for storage, you're not getting all the benefits you could be from the space.     20989144     Making the most of your basement doesn't have to mean costly contractors and expensive remodeling scenarios. Several easy DIY projects that you can take on alone, with the aid of the right tools, can help you gain that extra space you wish for.   Ready to get started? Give these projects a try:   * Build walls. Adding drywall to your basement has a big impact on the space immediately. Use 2-by-4s to mark where the walls will stand and place studs 16 inches apart. Then nail the panels to the wall where the edges meet the studs and cover the seams with drywall tape. Once the walls are up, mud the seams and areas where nail pops appear. A drywall saw or power saw will help you shape your drywall perfectly, but if you don't own one, you don't have to buy one. It's more cost efficient to simply rent it instead for this one-time project. Your local American Rental Association member rental store will have what you need. Don't forget to add drywall stands to your rental list.   * A touch of paint. A fresh coat of paint means you won't have to stare at those drab walls in your new space. You can paint the space by hand, but if you have a large basement and you want to give every room that professional look, rent a paint sprayer instead. The cost is worth the time saved.   * Freshen up your floor. If your basement is completely unfinished, you probably have cold, concrete floors. How you improve them is up to you. If you want the polished, marbled look, consider renting concrete floor finishing equipment for a look that's sure to amaze. And if the appearance of hardwood is more your style, laminate flooring panels are inexpensive and easy to install. Lastly, if you want the feel of carpet beneath your feet, don't forget to add the pad first to make those future steps a pleasure.   * Eliminate the stink. Your new basement is coming together, now what can you do about that musty basement smell? A dehumidifier can help. You can purchase one at your local home goods store and when you get it home, try to place it near the washtub sink if your basement has one. This will allow you to drain right into the sink and save you from having to empty the dehumidifier regularly.   * Install a sump pump. Now that you've refinished your basement, don't let water damage ruin all your hard work. A sump pump can protect against flooding issues and installing one is easy. Most new homes have a location marked for a sump pump; it will look like a small well. Follow the water pipes in your home and you can find it. Once you do, purchase a sump pump from your local home goods store and follow the easy instructions to install in less than an hour.   The extra space you have dreamed of has been with you all along. Transform your basement from barren to beautiful and you'll be creating a space you can enjoy for years to come. To learn more about renting the tools you need for your home improvement projects, visit RentalHQ.com.
February
6

Many expectant parents upgrade to larger homes when baby's on the way. If you're thinking of buying a new home to accommodate your growing family, it's important to assess certain factors you may not consider otherwise, including:         Master Bedroom Proximity – Is the master bedroom on a separate floor from the others? Will you want to be adjacent to your baby's nursery, or are you comfortable with sleeping down the hall? Always consider the layout of the bedrooms before buying.   Pool Safety – If you're seeking a home with a pool, keep in mind that your child will likely venture outside before he or she knows how to swim. Is the pool appropriately gated, with no holes or gaps in fencing? Are all latches and locks in proper working order? Is the door leading outside secure?   Property Hazards – Evaluate the home for any potential dangers, including stairs, tree roots or uneven pavers. These can be easily overlooked by a curious child and lead to unnecessary injury.   Street Location – Take into account how far your home is from a busy area. Is the home located on a congested street? What is the posted speed limit in the area and how fast do cars typically drive through the neighborhood? Are there streetlights and crosswalks nearby?   Published with permission from RISMedia.
February
3

Whether you're planning to sell your home, or you simply want a more updated look, there are any number of cheap, simple fixes, from new paint to new curtains, that will improve its overall appearance. But, said home contractor Scott McGillivray, host of HGTV's Income Property, these seven relatively inexpensive fixes can give you more return on investment (ROI) than many – both in terms of home improvement value and easy-on-the-eye enhancement you can enjoy.     Start with these, McGillvray blogged: Kitchen hardware – Today's drawer and cabinet pulls come in dozens of styles and finishes. Installing a style that appeals to you can immediately make a dated kitchen look more modern and functional.   Refinished hardwood deck – An attractive deck is high on the list of improvements with proven ROI – especially if the deck is more than 100 square feet in size. Heated floors and towel racks – In cold weather regions, heated tile floors and/or heated towel racks in the bathroom can add a surprising amount of value – especially is there is no other heat source in the room.   Chic moldings - One of the easiest ways to get a high-end look at a reasonable price is with applied moldings on living room and dining room baseboards and ceilings.   New front door – Dollar for dollar, a new front door delivers a terrific ROI – as are other exterior updates like new windows and siding, which are highly appealing to future buyers looking for security and insulation. Garage storage – Shelves, organizers, and work benches in the garage can make any homeowner's life easier. No need for custom work. You'll find all you need at home improvement stores. Neatness counts – Nothing ensures curb appeal and improves a home value more than thorough and consistent maintenance, McGillvray said. So mow the lawns, clean the gutters, and keep the windows clean.   Published with permission from RISMedia.

Login to My Homefinder

Login to My Homefinder